What To Expect When Selling Your Business

Building a successful business takes years of effort and attention. Having expended plenty of blood, sweat and tears over that time, business owners want to maximize their value when selling.

Many of the qualities that make a business owner successful will benefit a business seller, too. However, not many owners have much experience in selling a business. It is a long, complex process. Here are some of the major issues business owners should consider before, during and after a sale to secure the best value for their hard work.

Preparing For The Sale

No matter what sort of business you own or how big it is, determine why you are selling and what your priorities are. Do you want to hold out for an all-cash sale, which may be harder to successfully negotiate, or are you willing to consider an installment sale or taking equity in the acquiring company? Do you have a minimum price determined by factors other than the business’s value, such as your retirement plans? Do you want to preserve the jobs of family members or long-term employees? These and other considerations may seem obvious, but it is essential that you articulate them to yourself before you begin.

It is generally wise to hire outside help. Look for advisers who have relevant experience and vet them thoroughly. Make sure your experts have no potential conflicts of interest in a sale. Advisers you might consider hiring include an accountant, a tax expert, legal counsel, an appraiser or valuation expert, an investment banker and an intermediary or broker. Some people may fill more than one of these roles, and not every business sale will require all of them. Almost every business owner, however, will want at minimum an accountant, legal counsel and an intermediary on their side before and during a sale. The broker or intermediary can be the point person for identifying and working with potential buyers. The accountant (and the tax expert, if they aren’t the same person) will help you get your books in order and consider issues such as how to allocate the business’s purchase price most effectively and how to deal with federal, state and local tax concerns. Legal counsel will draft and review the documents and agreements necessary to complete the sale.

Be aware that many lawyers or other advisers will expect you to sign retainer agreements up front once you have decided to hire them. This protects both parties, but it can mean a substantial outlay of money at the beginning of the process. Also, if you have a business that is very small, you may have trouble finding a broker who is interested in your transaction. Many brokers who specialize in business sales look for businesses valued at several hundred thousand dollars or more. For very large businesses, an owner is more likely to hire an intermediary, who generally functions as a consultant and offers more sophisticated services.

Once you have hired a team, work with it to understand how the sales process will unfold before you start. The better you understand the process, the more purposeful you can be with your choices throughout. One key aspect to have in order early is your bookkeeping and records. Consider conducting a mock due diligence process to make sure you are thoroughly prepared for a prospective buyer’s examination. You may also want to obtain an objective third-party valuation. This will give you a realistic idea of your business’s worth and will help you decide on a realistic asking price.

Once a potential buyer has been identified, a tighter focus on compiling and presenting books and records is warranted, since the buyer will be able to specify the information for review and the preferred format. For example, many prospective buyers want to see books and records that have been prepared according to generally accepted accounting principles (GAAP), which most small businesses do not routinely use. The process of converting a business’s books to GAAP can be a significant undertaking, so if this is a concern, it should be addressed early in the process.

Finally, don’t neglect personal preparation for letting your business go. Create or revisit your personal financial plan. Try to work out several scenarios for the sale to see how it will affect your short-term and long-term goals. For some business owners, especially founders, letting go of a business can also have an emotional component. Know what you plan to do next and accept that the new owners will change your business once you are gone. Both you and your business will begin new chapters after the sale closes.

The Sale

The process of selling a business can be protracted. Once you begin, prepare yourself for the sale to take six to 12 months, though, obviously, this timeline can vary. To make your business more attractive, consider improving assets, cleaning up potential liabilities and generally taking care to make your business look its best. Much as you might repaint your house before you sell it, you can take steps to spruce up your business, too. Consider the timing of the sale; try to avoid selling right before a lease or key contract expires so that a buyer doesn’t face the prospect of renegotiating it as soon as he or she arrives.

Ensure that your business continues to operate effectively throughout the sale process. The sale can occupy a large chunk of your attention if you are not careful. Be sure to manage your time wisely and do not neglect day-to-day operations. Keeping performance high will not only make the business more attractive from without, but also will keep morale and dedication high within your staff. This is another reason to hire outside consultants, as spreading yourself too thin may hurt the business and ultimately reduce the price you can obtain.

Consider carefully who in the business needs to know that your company is for sale. You have a duty to any partners or co-owners, as well as to shareholders, which may dictate a certain level of disclosure. However, widespread knowledge that the business is for sale can create anxiety among employees, customers and vendors. This, too, can reduce the ultimate selling price.

Once you or your broker has identified a prospective buyer, it makes sense to prequalify the candidate to make sure nobody’s time is wasted. During the prequalification process, you will also want to secure confidentiality or nondisclosure agreements. Serious buyers should not have problems agreeing to such terms; if they resist, treat it as a red flag. (The same holds true for your team of advisers, who should also formally agree not to disclose sensitive information about the business.)

The prospective buyer should offer a letter of intent, which is a nonbinding offer outlining all the major terms of the proposed transaction, including the total purchase price, the structure and all other important conditions. The letter of intent serves as a basis for you, your buyer and your respective lawyers to negotiate terms and draft the final legal documents. Be sure to have a good idea of which terms you are willing to compromise on and which are deal breakers. As a rule, the more thorough and specific you can be during the early stages of a deal, the better.